Archive for July 7th, 2008

source: Mmegi
BRIAN BENZA
Staff Writer

Food and fuel prices have pushed some countries to a “tipping point”, with import-dependent poor and middle-income nations such as Botswana confronted by balance of payment problems, high inflation and worsening poverty, a new IMF study warns.

The IMF says that the impact of surging oil and food prices is being felt globally, but is most acute in countries that rely heavily on imports and poorer ones, which have a higher percentage of their incomes going towards food and energy. Already in Botswana, inflation has been skyrocketing for the past eight months and there are no indications of it slowing down soon. Analysing the macroeconomic policy challenges arising from the price surges, the study argues that many governments will have to adjust policies in response to the price shock while the international community will need to do its share to address this global problem.

The IMF said oil and food prices were likely to ease only slightly as supply caught up, but admitted there [continue reading]

source: allAfrica
The East African (Nairobi)
6 July 2008
Posted to the web 7 July 2008

Philip Ngunjiri
Nairobi

The increasing amount of broadband capacity in Africa has seen some operators begin to offer “triple-play” – that is voice, Internet and broadcast content – giving rise to satellite pay-TV market, which fits into the continent’s existing broadcast and media market.

But according to a new report on Africa’s broadband, – African Broadband, Triple Play and Converged Markets – the converged content has come too early to the continent with mobile TV being rolled out in several countries, including Kenya.

With the demand for Internet access continuing to grow at exponential rates on the continent as well as the increased amount of Internet traffic due to multimedia, Internet service providers are now faced with the challenge of keeping up with demand for network bandwidth.

Innovative service providers and equipment manufactures are developing creative solutions for [continue reading]

source: Mmegi
RYDER GABATHUSE
Staff Writers

FRANCISTOWN: Two top mangers of copper-nickel mining giant Tati Nickel have tendered their resignation letters.

The General Manager of Tati Nickel Peet Kotze heads back to his native South Africa to pursue other interests after a year at the helm of Tati. Kotze is a renowned metallurgist and mining engineer. He explained his reasons for exit: “What happened is that I got an offer in South Africa to head the coal mining giant SA MHL, a coal mining company with interests in both Mpumalanga and Kwazulu Natal.” Kotze has been recruited as a director of SA MHL.

He emphasised that he was not being pushed out of his current job but was leaving of his own accord to pursue new challenges.

His impression about the Tati Nickel was that the mine has a promising future. “The future of the Tati Nickel is very good. We are currently [continue reading]

source: allAfrica
Angola Press Agency (Luanda)

5 July 2008
Posted to the web 7 July 2008

Lusaka

The meeting of ministers responsible for education and training of personnel in the Southern Africa Development Communique (SADC) reviewed the progress scored in the implementation of the regional plan on education and training.

This was said Friday in Lusaka by Angolan deputy minister of Education for Educational Reform, Pinda Simão.

Speaking to Angop, at the end of the meeting held in Lusaka (Zambia), the official explained that the implementation of this plan integrates and harmonises the priorities of the SADC Protocol on Education and Training.

It also integrates and harmonises the Plan of Action for the second decennium of Education of the African Union Commission, and recognises the objectives of [continue reading]

source: Mmegi
BRIAN BENZA
Staff Writer

Botswana continues to be an example to many African countries on governance issues on the back of tight control on corruption and economic and political stability.

According to the 2008 Worldwide Governance Indicators (WGI) report compiled by World Bank researchers, Botswana is among over a dozen developing countries showing great progress in governance issues.

“Botswana continues to set the example for other countries on the continent, particularly as control of corruption, economic and political stability are measured,” said Lead Operations Officer for the World Bank in Botswana, Dirk Reinermann, commending the country.

“It is a mature democracy with deeply-rooted standards of good governance,” Reinermann said. Since independence, the country has transformed from one of the poorest African nations with a US$80 per capita income to an upper middle-income country today with US$6000 per capita. The report also says that although the remarkable growth has been largely driven by the [continue reading]

source: allAfrica
Zimbabwe Standard (Harare)

5 July 2008
Posted to the web 6 July 2008

Bertha Shoko, Vusumuzi Sifile and Davison Maruziva
Harare

THE proposed new full-time mediator in the Zimbabwean crisis, AU Commission chair Jean Ping, and President Thabo Mbeki of South Africa are expected in the country this week amid speculation they will be seeking to bring MDC leader Morgan Tsvangirai and President Robert Mugabe together.

African diplomats told The Standard last week that the two would be expected to arrive from the G-8 Summit in Japan and that they will be in Zimbabwe as part of efforts to get the MDC and Zanu PF to begin talks on a transitional arrangement.

Mbeki flew into Harare yesterday on his way to the G8 nations’ summit, which runs in Japan from tomorrow until Wednesday, when he and Ping are expected to [continue reading]

source: Mmegi
STRYKER MOTLALOSO
Staff Writer

In what could be a true show of character, the Botswana government has taken a strong stand against Zimbabwe, based on a report of the findings of the Pan African Parliament and the SADC Election Observers.

The two reports say the presidential run-off did not meet the minimum standards of a fair election. The observers said the elections did not meet the unfettered will of the people of Zimbabwe.

Botswana concluded that the current representatives of the Zimbabwe government be excluded from attending both SADC and AU meetings. Though laudable, Botswana’s support will not carry much weight if it is not supported by a reasonable number of both SADC and the AU members. It will perhaps serve the purpose of disassociating the country from the Mugabe regime. And more importantly, it will be more felt at the level of state to state, particularly if Botswana recalls its envoy from Zimbabwe. The other step would be for Botswana to close its border with Zimbabwe. But would Botswana do this?

To some extent, the problem is that the AU has not adequately pronounced its position regarding the [continue reading]

source: allAfrica
Cape Argus (Cape Town)

6 July 2008
Posted to the web 6 July 2008

In a day of high drama on the Zimbabwe front, MDC leader Morgan Tsvirangirai snubbed a meeting between him, President Thabo Mbeki and Robert Mugabe – and a British newspaper has posted a film on its website showing voters being forced to vote for Mugabe.

What was anticipated to be a major breakthrough in the Zimbabwean crisis – a face-to-face meeting between Mugabe and Tsvangirai – collapsed yesterday when the MDC leader failed to arrive.

And a Zimbabwe prison officer used a hidden camera given to him by The Guardian to film how he and his colleagues were forced to vote for Mugabe. The newspaper said in the film and accompanying stories that the officer, Shepherd Yuda, fled Zimbabwe on Friday and was now with his family in an undisclosed location.

Meanwhile Mbeki flew to Harare yesterday after spending the past five days setting up [continue reading]

source: Mmegi
THATO CHWAANE
Staff Writer

Three senior officials have retired from the Ministry of Education and Skills Development.

Makgothi has been in charge of educational development services since 2004. He has been at the ministry for over 30 years. He started his career in 1976 as a Science teacher at Madiba Secondary School. He became the deputy head of the school in 1980 and headmaster a year later. Makgothi was later transferred to head Gaborone Secondary School for eight years. He was promoted to head planning, statistics and research division in the Ministry of Education.

Makghothi graduated from the University of Botswana, Lesotho, and Swaziland (UBLS) with a Bachelor of Science degree and Post Graduate Diploma in Educational Management from Edinburgh University. He has attended advanced training programme in educational planning and [continue reading]