Archive for April 19th, 2007

source: BOPA
19 April, 2007

PALAPYE – Palapye MP Boyce Sebetela has adviced his constituents to gear up for the advent of free trade in the SADC region.

The era, the MP told a kgotla meeting at Boikago ward on Monday demanded very high work ethics such as efficiency and productivity.

Once SADC free movement of goods, services and people takes effect in the region beginning next year, Mr Sebetela said, it will be ursher in an era of tough competition for markets, among others.

Liberalisation of markets, the MP who was once assistant minister for Finance and Development Planning said, was not a theoretical thing as some people believe.

He said all Batswana should embrace the challenges presented by the free movement era and be prepared to compete with businesses from other SADC countries.

Mr Sebetela said by 2010 government protectionism as expected by the SADC protocol on free movement will cease to exist.

This, he said calls for local businesses to start positioning themselves and working hard to reap the reward presented by the huge market opportunity of the 14 member states.

On other issues, he informed residents that with the coming to an end of the Cotonuo agreements this year, Botswana beef will now face stiff competition for the lucrative European market.

This therefore, he said means that farmers should supply the Botswana Meat Commission Cattle with quality cattle.

He implored all Batswana with field and boreholes which have been abandoned to [continue reading]


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source: news24
18/04/2007 19:58 – (SA)

Johannesburg – At least 600 000 people had accessed services on the upgraded transport information system by 13:00 on Wednesday, said the transport department.

“That is phenomenal,” the department’s safety promotions manager Ntau Letebele said.

Letebele acknowledged that the system was still shaky in some areas like Johannesburg and Pretoria.

“Our technicians are working on it…to make the system stable”.

The best-performing stations were Windsor Park in Durban with 4 259 transactions, 3 793 in Tshwane Central RA, 3 291 in Johannesburg and 2 722 in Bloemfontein.

‘Please be patient?’

Vehicle-testing stations, vehicle-registering authorities [continue reading]

source: allAfrica

Mmegi/The Reporter (Gaborone)

April 18, 2007
Posted to the web April 18, 2007

Monkagedi Gaotlhobogwe

The Executive Director of the Botswana Chamber of Commerce, Industry and Manpower (BOCCIM) Mariah Machailo-Ellis has called on chain stores to copy the example of Choppies to ensure that Batswana are empowered in the retail business.

She was prompted by Choppies’ unprecedented move to advertise 68 management trainee positions last week. The store , which has 48 branches countrywide , announced early this year that Batswana may buy the Choppies franchise.

Choppies has moved ahead of older chain stores in recruiting young Batswana for management positions. “Other chain stores should take a leaf out of Choppies’ book. Choppies is proving that it is possible to localize management posts in chain stores,” the outspoken director of the federation of employers said.

Machailo-Ellis said there was no reason why chain stores that had been doing business in Botswana for decades were still operating with expatriate managers.

“Besides, expatriates are expensive to maintain. Empowering Batswana to take up these management positions would save the companies a lot of money,” she said.

She urged Choppies to fulfill their promise. “We hope this is not just lip-service. It would be good for Batswana if Choppies fast-tracked its citizen empowerment programme,” she said. Choppies Human Resources Manager Ben Stergling told [continue reading]

source: allAfrica

Mmegi/The Reporter (Gaborone)

April 18, 2007
Posted to the web April 18, 2007

Bame Piet

Police have recorded a 23 percent increase in theft of motor vehicles since the beginning of the year compared to the same period last year. While 89 vehicles were reported stolen during the same period last year, the thieves have struck 110 times this year.

Senior Superintendent Milton Mapange of the Serious Crime Squad said yesterday that most of the cars are abandoned after they are used in the commission of other crimes like robbery and house break-ins. He revealed that the criminals target Toyota vehicles, especially mini-buses and open vans. “They also target government vehicles parked in schools, clinics and council premises,” he said. Mapange added that most of the stolen cars have been recovered and the police are following leads about the missing ones. He explained that car theft often involves syndicates because a vehicle should have an immediate market after it has been stolen. He suspected that scrap yards are a lucrative market for stolen cars in Botswana. The vehicles are stripped at the yards and their parts sold to unsuspecting customers.

Like many senior police officers, Mapange complained about the slow pace at which court cases are finalised. He said that motor theft is committed by the same people who are out on bail for similar or [continue reading]

source: BOPA
18 April, 2007

PALAPYE – The project coordinator of the planned Botswana International University of Science and Technology says she is confident that the university will open its doors to students in 2009.

Ms Badumetse Hubona said even though she agreed with Palapye residents that time was running out, she said government was committed to opening the institution to its first 2 500 students in 2009.

Ms Hubona informed the residents that an environmental impact assessment study has begun, and that the education ministry was in the process of establishing a transactional advisory team which would be responsible for drafting legal documents inviting businesses for partnership in the project.

She said the university was originally scheduled to open in 2007 but because of major tasks such as the environmental impact study, acquiring a plot, identifying partners, and other logistics that were to be in place first, the date was pushed to 2009.

She said the education ministry was negotiating with other stakeholder ministries to employ the vice-chancellor of the new university.

Palapye residents had expressed their scepticism on the university opening its doors in 2009.

They said nothing was happening on the ground to convince them that all was going according to plan.

One of the residents, Mr Pius Ramogapi, said the works that needed to be in [continue reading]